SnagFilms

Jun 19

moviemezzanine:

INTERVIEW: Gillian Robespierre & Jenny Slate of Obvious Child
by Charles Nash
As fun as the summer movie season can be, it can get pretty overwhelming with its abundance of sequels, franchises and big-budget blockbusters. That’s why Obvious Child, the feature-film debut from director Gillian Robespierre starring the adorable Jenny Slate, commonly known for her supporting role as Mona Lisa in Parks and Recreation, is such a delightful surprise. An indie comedy that manages to be as poignantly sweet as it is hilariously raunchy, which tells the story of Donna, a struggling stand-up comedian who’s been recently dumped by her boyfriend and rebounds by spending a night with the clean-cut Max (Jake Lacy) resulting in an accidental pregnancy.
I was fortunate enough to sit down with Gillian Robespierre and Jenny Slate with fellow journalists, Brett Michel from The Improper Bostonian and Ken Murray from IWantMyTwoDollars.com to conduct a round-table interview about their new film, which tackles considerably taboo material from a funny, insightful and refreshingly feminist point of view.
Click here for the full roundtable interview with the women behind Obvious Child

moviemezzanine:

INTERVIEW: Gillian Robespierre & Jenny Slate of Obvious Child

by Charles Nash

As fun as the summer movie season can be, it can get pretty overwhelming with its abundance of sequels, franchises and big-budget blockbusters. That’s why Obvious Child, the feature-film debut from director Gillian Robespierre starring the adorable Jenny Slate, commonly known for her supporting role as Mona Lisa in Parks and Recreation, is such a delightful surprise. An indie comedy that manages to be as poignantly sweet as it is hilariously raunchy, which tells the story of Donna, a struggling stand-up comedian who’s been recently dumped by her boyfriend and rebounds by spending a night with the clean-cut Max (Jake Lacy) resulting in an accidental pregnancy.

I was fortunate enough to sit down with Gillian Robespierre and Jenny Slate with fellow journalists, Brett Michel from The Improper Bostonian and Ken Murray from IWantMyTwoDollars.com to conduct a round-table interview about their new film, which tackles considerably taboo material from a funny, insightful and refreshingly feminist point of view.

Click here for the full roundtable interview with the women behind Obvious Child

Jun 17

Philip the Great

by Michael Rodriguez

The New York Times
 is not alone in thinking Philip Seymour Hoffman was “perhaps the most ambitious and widely admired American actor of his generation.” The late actor’s career was marked by challenging and inspiring performances from collaborations with director Paul Thomas Anderson, to films like Synecdoche New York, and Capote. On top of that, his films have ranked highly among audiences and critics alike. 
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But before Hoffman was cursing out Adam Sandler in Punch Drunk Love, starring opposite Julianne Moore in Magnolia, or even trading lines with Jennifer Lawrence inThe Hunger Games: Catching Fire, he stumbled upon his career through the lens of independent film. Little did he know he was beginning a path that would lead him to be known as one of the greatest actors of our generation. 
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Why not check out the film that started it all? Philip Seymour Hoffman makes his on screen debut in Triple Bogey On a Par Five Hole, a film noir-inspired detective story about a married couple who rob golfers. The film follows screenwriter Remy Gravelle as he goes around interviewing suspects that were close to the couple, as research for an upcoming feature film he’s penning about the criminal duo. In this way, the film recalls Orwell’s Citizen Kane, and the many classic noir detective narratives that followed it. In this black and white, fast-talking, corrupt world, no one can be trusted. 
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See the film that kickstarted the career of one of the most beloved actors of our generation. What are you waiting for? 

“All movies assault the viewer in one way or another.” — Michael Haneke (via davidlynchslunch)

(via ericrohmer)

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Jun 16

Get Your Pride On!

By Safana Khan

Last year, President Barack Obama declared June to be Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Month. At SnagFilms, we were clapping and feeling patriotic, sort of like this baby:

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It’s June again and now we have a special treat for you.

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Yes, you should be as excited as Stefon. Now, get ready to look like this man:

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because we’ve compiled a list of our favorite LGBT related films just for you. These films will make you feel all kinds of emotions. Here they are:

 

Last but not least, we’ve paired with The Trevor Project which is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGBTQ young people. We will be donating $.10 every time someone retweets the following tweet: 

Rt & follow @thebentblog to donate $.10 to @TrevorProject. Share the #pride & watch free LGBT films on @snagfilms: http://t.co/X1olwnlmLO

— SnagFilms (@SnagFilms)
June 11, 2014

 We promise, there’s no catch! 

Jun 13

Where Would We Be Without Subtitles?

By Safana Khan

Remember when you cried and looked like an overgrown baby when you watched Academy-Award winning Iranian film A Separation

Or how about when you knew life was going to work out perfectly after watching Academy Award-wining French film Amélie?

Unless you speak Farsi or French, you’re pretty much out of luck when it comes to watching these gems. Technically you still watch them but you probably won’t understand a word.

This is precisely why we are working to enhance our viewing experience by supporting English captions. We’ve partnered with Amara, a volunteer driven captioning platform, but we need your help! Join the SnagFilms captioning community here: http://bit.ly/SnagAmara

                               Thank you and Happy Captioning! 

 

Jun 12

Films for the Book Worm

by Safana Khan

Chances are we have a film based on your favorite book or about your favorite author!

1) Arundhati Roy

The beautiful and brilliant author won the Man Booker Prize for her novel The God of Small Things. Watch this film about her humanitarian work in India.image

2) George Orwell

In his essay “Such Such Were the Joys,” Orwell describes himself as an “unattractive boy” but we disagree. Watch the film version of his genius work, Animal Farm.

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3. Oscar Wilde 

Wilde makes our brains and hearts run wild. Watch a rendition of his four-act comedy Lady Windermere’s Fan.

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4) Mark Twain 

Since most of us have probably only read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, we might as well watch this film, which is an adaption of Twain’s Roughing It. Check out that ‘stache.

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5) Leo Tolstoy 

While the book may have taken you ages to read, the film version of Anna Karenina is only an hour and change. We still love you, Tolstoy. 

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6) Franz Kafka 

He basically ranted against the system before it was cool to do so.

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7) Sherwood Anderson

Here’s a film based on Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio. If you’ve read it then you’re one step ahead of us in terms of summer reading! 

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8) Anton Chekhov

Chekhov (a.k.a. the Original Condescending Wonka) once said, “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”  We’re certainly glad he had a love affair with literature because now you can watch this film based on one of his many short stories!

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9) Ayn Rand.  

Enough said. This documentary will tell you everything you ever wanted to know about her. 

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10) William Shakespeare

Did your high school teachers tell you this?

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Oh and here’s something…just for kicks

Jun 11

[video]

Do You Believe In Aliens?

By Safana Khan

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Yup, that’s right. You can watch them below:

Jun 05

[video]